MINORS

Sociology Minor

 Sociology minors are required to complete the following courses, totaling 15 semester hours

  • SOCI 1000 Introduction to Sociology  (3)                      
  • SOCI 4000, 4475, or 3900  (Option of Theory or Methodology)  (3)                     
  • SOCI Electives (must be SOCI courses)    (9)

 These courses must be satisfied with a grade of "C" or higher. Under no circumstances will a "D" grade count toward the minor.

Gerontology Minor

Gerontologists study the cultural, physical, social, and economic conditions of older adults. Gerontology differs from Geriatrics in that geriatrics is concerned with the clinical and medical aspects of aging, whereas gerontology is concerned with more social aspects of how aging affects populations. In recent years, issues in minority aging have received particular attention. The Sociology department offers a minor in Gerontology.

The minor curriculum combines two basic kinds of expertise: (1) increased knowledge of the sociological processes of aging, and (2) the development of in-service skills to address the social needs which accompany these processes.

Students electing this minor do so to accomplish different goals: (1) training for a service career in the field of aging; (2) preparation for a specialized graduate program; or, (3) personal enrichment and development in understanding the aging process. The gerontology minor is an asset to students seeking employment in such fields as health care, counseling, recreation, nutritional service, education, business, welfare services, and private and public administration.

 Minor Requirements: 15 hours (Four required courses plus one elective)

 Required Courses: Students must make a “C” or better

  • SOCI 1000 Introduction to Sociology
  • SOCI 2250 Introduction to Gerontology
  • SOCI 2350 Death and Dying
  • SOCI 3450 Social Policy and Aging

 Electives:

  • SOCI 3700 Medical Sociology
  • SOCI 3200 Civil Society and Social Responsibility
  • SOCI 3360 Globalization in the 21st Century
  • SOCI 3500 Race, Ethnicity and Gender in Society
  • SOCI 4200 Social Inequality & Stratification
  • SOCI 4500 Sociology Internship (3-6 hours)
  • PSYC 3351 Introduction to Counseling
  • PSYC 3358 Psychology of Aging
  •  

Criminology Minor

Criminologists study the criminal justice system and the causes and consequences of crime.  Criminologists examine how race, gender, social class, and geographic location, along with other variables, influence one’s likelihood of criminal activity.  The Sociology department offers a minor in Criminology. 

The minor curriculum provides the following skills: 1) an understanding of how the criminal justice system influences and is influenced by other societal institutions; 2) a mastery of the theoretical frameworks instrumental in understanding the process of the criminal justice system; 3) an awareness of the intersection of race, gender, and class, and its relationship to criminal activity as well as different typologies of crime and their frequency; and 4) knowledge of various societal sanctions in relation to crime.

Students who decide to minor in Criminology will gain the following: 1) knowledge about specific fields within Criminology; 2) preparation for graduate school; and 3) critical thinking skills essential for success in a variety of occupations within the field which include, but are not limited to – policing, corrections, social work, legal secretary, and criminal investigator.  

The minor, which will be housed in the Sociology department, may also draw interest from Political Science majors/minors, as some of the electives within the minor are Political Science classes.  The minor also exudes the mission of the college – the program will be interdisciplinary with a focus on critical thinking, writing, and the pillars will be central to the Criminology minor.  For example, Criminology minors will examine the relationship between civility and policing and community service and crime rates.

Minor Requirements: 18 hours (Five core courses plus one elective)

Required Courses: Students must make a “C” or better

  • SOCI 1000 Introduction to Sociology
  • SOCI 3307 Criminology
  • SOCI 3400 Deviance and Criminology
  • SOCI 3550 Drugs and Society
  • SOCI 3850 Corrections and Society

Electives:

  • SOCI 3200 Civil Society and Social Responsibility
  • SOCI 3360 Globalization in the 21st Century
  • SOCI 3500 Race, Ethnicity and Gender in Society
  • SOCI 4200 Social Inequality & Stratification
  • SOCI 4500 Internships
  • POLS 1102 Introduction to Political Science
  • POLS 3312 Public Administration and Public Policy
  • POLS 3313 American Judicial Institutions
  • POLS 3314 American Constitutional Law: Institutions
  • POLS 3315 American Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights

Major Electives (18 hours)

Students may complete their major by electing three other courses from the following list:    

  • SOCI 2000                   Social Issues and Policies in Global Perspective                   
  • SOCI 2200                   Social Work: Introducing Theory and Practice                       
  • SOCI 2250                   Introduction to Gerontology                                                   
  • SOCI 2300                   Sociology of Sports                                                               
  • SOCI 2350                   Death and Dying                                                                   
  • SOCI 2500                   Kinship and Families                                                              
  • SOCI 2700                   Introduction to Poverty Studies                                              
  • SOCI 3000                   Social Change & Social Movements                                    
  • SOCI 3307                   Criminology                                                                           
  • SOCI 3340                   Sociology of Religion                                                              
  • SOCI 3360                   Globalization in the 21st Century                                         
  • SOCI 3400                   Deviance and Criminology                                                     
  • SOCI 3430                   Bioethics                                                                                 
  • SOCI 3450                   Social policy and Aging                                                         
  • SOCI 3500                   Race, Ethnicity and Gender in Society                                 
  • SOCI 3550                   Drugs and Society                                                                  
  • SOCI 3600                   Sociology of Education                                                            
  • SOCI 3700                   Medical Sociology                                                                   
  • SOCI 3800                   Special Topics in Sociology                                                     
  • SOCI 3850                   Corrections and Society                                                         
  • SOCI 3975                   Methods of Program Evaluation                                        
  • SOCI 4200                   Social Inequality & Stratification                                           
  • SOCI 4475                   Theory II                                                                                                                                          
  • PSYC 1101                   Introduction to Psychology                                                  
  • PSYC 3302                   Human Growth and Development                                         
  • PSYC 3321                   Social Psychology
  • PSYC 3351                   Introduction to Counseling                                          
  • HIST 3000                   Public History                                                                       
  • HIST 3416                   Twentieth Century America                                                  

One (1) Interim courses taught by Sociology faculty may be counted as electives if approved by Program Coordinator.

 

CONCENTRATIONS

Gerontology Concentration

The Sociology program offers a Gerontology concentration for Sociology majors as well as a Gerontology minor open to all students. These options are designed to offer training to those interested in pursuing a career in serving the aging. Both the concentration and the minor provide a strong basis in critical issues of the field, and practical hands-on experience through the internship. Graduates with a minor or concentration in gerontology will have the foundation for pursuing a variety of careers.

STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES Graduates with a minor or concentration in Gerontology should demonstrate:

  • Competency in the basic components and knowledge involving the services needed for an aging population in the U.S.
  • An understanding of the contemporary issues facing an aging population and the social issues involved
  • An awareness of global issues facing an aging population

ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Sociology majors graduating with a concentration in gerontology are required to successfully complete the capstone senior seminar, research and defend a senior paper as well as pass a major field exit examination. Through these requirements, students must demonstrate their mastery of the major’s objectives.

For Gerontology minor, 15 semester hours are required.

For Sociology major with a Gerontology concentration, a total of 36 semester hours is required:

9 hours of Gerontology courses

  • SOCI 2250 Introduction to Gerontology
  • SOCI 2350 Death and Dying
  • SOCI 3450 Social Policy and Aging

15 hours of required Sociology major courses

  • SOCI 3900 Methods I: Introduction to Methodology
  • SOCI 3950 Methods II: Understanding Data Analysis
  • SOCI 4000 or 4475 Theory I or Theory II
  • SOCI 4950 Presenting Social Analysis (Senior Seminar)
12 hours in Sociology electives

These courses must be satisfied with a grade of "C" or higher

 

Health and Medicine Concentration (Sociology Majors)

Medical sociology is the study of the societal dimensions of health and medicine. It is a well-recognized field that offers great preparation for graduate school in the health-related professions. The Sociology Department has a good sequence of courses in the department for students with a pre-med or pre-health career path.  Students often plan to go to medical school, attend a graduate program in health services administration, or seek a program in social work. Students may seek jobs in human resources as well as recruiting in a health software companies.

The Health and Medicine concentration introduces students to the relationship between society and health. In this concentration, students will study the impact of social, cultural, political, and economic factors on health and vice-versa. Courses in this area examine issues such as health behavior, physical and mental illnesses, doctor-patient interaction, medicalization, health care reform, health care delivery and health policy. This concentration is for students interested in jobs related to medical, mental health, or social service fields, patient advocacy, mental health facilities or nursing homes, administrative positions, and program planning.

Health and Medicine Concentration (requirements)

The Sociology program offers a Health and Medicine concentration for Sociology majors. These options are designed to offer training to those interested in pursuing a career in serving the aging. Both the concentration and the minor provide a strong basis in critical issues of the field, and practical hands-on experience through the internship. Graduates with a minor or concentration in gerontology will have the foundation for pursuing a variety of careers.

STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES Graduates with a concentration in Health and Medicine should demonstrate:

  • Competency in the basic components and knowledge involving the services involving medical care, research and health issues for a global population and the population in the U.S.
  • An understanding of the contemporary issues in healthcare facing the population and the social issues involved
  • An awareness of global healthcare issues facing a world population

ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Sociology majors graduating with a concentration in gerontology are required to successfully complete the capstone senior seminar, research and defend a senior paper as well as pass a major field exit examination. Through these requirements, students must demonstrate their mastery of the major’s objectives.

For Sociology major with a Health and Medicine concentration, a total of 36 semester hours is required:

15 hours of Health and Medicine courses

  • SOCI 2000 Social Issues and policy
  • SOCI 2350 Death and Dying
  • SOCI 3700 Medical Sociology
  • SOCI 3975 Program Evaluation
  • SOCI 3430 (Phil 3430) Bioethics

15 hours of required Sociology major courses

  • SOCI 1000 Introduction to Sociology
  • SOCI 3900 Methods I: Introduction to Methodology
  • SOCI 3950 Methods II: Understanding Data Analysis
  • SOCI 4000 or 4475 Theory I or Theory II
  • SOCI 4950 Presenting Social Analysis (Senior Seminar)

6 hours in Sociology electives

These courses must be satisfied with a grade of "C" or higher