Online Courses

January 2015 Undergraduate Online Courses

INTM 3490 - Rick's Word: The Walking Dead and Philosophy
(3 credit hours)
This course examines philosophical concepts couched in popular culture. Viewing popular culture as a
sounding board for cultural concepts began with the Critical School of Social Thought in the 1930s. Today, media and visual culture have become a mainstay of social thought and the analysis of cultural concepts and philosophy. The popular graphic novel and television program provide the background for the examination of major philosophers.

Spring 2015 Undergraduate Online Courses

CORE 1140 – Computer Applications
(1 credit hour)
Mathematical techniques and computer methods with spreadsheets are used in the development of quantitative reasoning skills. These techniques are examined in the contexts of business and economics and of sustainability through managing one's personal finances.
Prerequisite: MATH 1101 or higher

CORE 2002 – Humanities: Renaissance to the Present
(3 credit hours)
This course focuses on our cultural heritage with an emphasis on the impact of the Judeo-Christian tradition as it relates to all knowledge. The course balances the instructor's selected academic theme with a common set of assignments and academic skill sets. The period from 1660 to the present is covered in this course. Students confront primary and secondary source materials in order to gain a historical consciousness.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102

EXCS 3331 – Personal Health Issues
(3 credit hours)
This course focuses on our cultural heritage with an emphasis on the impact of the Judeo-Christian tradition as it relates to all knowledge. The course balances the instructor's selected academic theme with a common set of assignments and academic skill sets. The period from 1660 to the present is covered in this course. Students confront primary and secondary source materials in order to gain a historical consciousness.
Prerequisite: None

MUSI 4413 – Business of Music Industry
(3 credit hours)
The study of basic issues pertaining to the music industry: music copyrights, music synchronization, musical mechanical licensing, standard music contracts, royalties, artists' advances and contracts, buyouts. Introduction to the major licensing organizations, i.e., ASCAP, BMI, SESAC, and the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, the professional society of musicians.
Prerequisite: None

PSYC 1101 – Introduction to Psychology
(3 credit hours)
A survey of major topics in psychological science, including research methods, basic neuroanatomy, learning, perception, personality and abnormal behavior.
Prerequisite to all other PSYC courses.
Note: There are multiple online sections of this course (Z1 and Z2).

PSYC 3358 – Psychology of Aging
(3 credit hours)
Human aging is examined from physiological (e.g., sensory and cardiovascular changes), psychological (e.g., memory and intellectual changes), and sociological (e.g., adjusting to retirement) perspectives. Also, death and disorders associated with aging (such as Alzheimer's Disease) are explored.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1101

SOCI 2200 – Social Work: Theory and Practice
(3 credit hours)
The purpose of the course is to introduce the perspective social worker to underlying theories associated with the field and to provide an overview of the history and practice of social work.
Prerequisite: None

SOCI 3500 – Race/Ethnicity and Gender in Society
(3 credit hours)
Students will become aware of the impacts of race, ethnicity and gender in a global society. The norms, values, and patterns of communication associated with each category and how these affect personal life choices and social status will be examined. Specifically, students will become aware of how our basic social institutions, such as the economy, the family, education, religion, and the political system are biased institutions with differing ideals and expectations for women and men as well as different race and ethnic groups.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1000

WMST 3500 – Race/Ethnicity and Gender in Society
(3 credit hours)
Students will become aware of the impacts of race, ethnicity and gender in a global society. The norms, values, and patterns of communication associated with each category and how these affect personal life choices and social status will be examined. Specifically, students will become aware of how our basic social institutions, such as the economy, the family, education, religion, and the political system are biased institutions with differing ideals and expectations for women and men as well as different race
and ethnic groups.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1000

MGMT 3370 – Management and Organization Behavior
(3 credit hours)
A study of the science and art of management, with special emphasis on motivating and leading individuals in an organization.
Prerequisites: MGMT 2200 and ECON 2200

MGMT 3385 – Management Information Systems
(3 credit hours)
This course is designed for future managers who need to understand and critically evaluate the role and potential contribution of information technology for their organizations, and understand and effectively apply various computerized support systems to make better decisions.
Prerequisites: MGMT 2200 and ECON 2200

Spring 2015 Graduate Online Courses

PHDE 5106 - Legal Issues in Philanthropy
(2 credit hours)
This course will examine legal issues pertinent to the regulation of philanthropic organizations. State and national laws and the implications for professionals in philanthropy and development will be explored.
Prerequisite: PHDE 5105

PHDE 5107 - Focused Research II
(1 credit hour)
A continuation of Focused Research I (PHDE 5105).
Prerequisite: PHDE 5105

Contact Us

LaGrange College Office of Admission
601 Broad Street
LaGrange, GA 30240
Phone: 706-880-8005
E-mail: admission@lagrange.edu


Learn through relationships at LaGrange College

No matter your student status, at LaGrange you'll be encouraged to explore your possibilities and focus on your individual passions. In a recent National Survey of Student Engagement, LaGrange ranked high for active and collaborative learning. That's not surprising, given that our campus is a hands-on environment, with faculty making every effort to involve their students in scholarly work and departmental research projects.
 
No matter your interests, there's a path of study waiting for you here. And our accomplished, engaging faculty will guide you along the way.