Evening College Courses

Evening College Courses

(Textbook Information)

General Education Courses


ART AND DESIGN

ARTD 1109 Art History Survey I (3)
A course in the visual arts of western civilization from the Paleolithic period through the 16th century. Cultures surveyed will include Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Greek, Roman, Early Christian, Byzantine, Medieval, Gothic and the Italian and Northern Renaissance.

ARTD 1110 Art History Survey II (3)
This course will survey the history of Western art and architecture from the Baroque period to the beginning of the 20th century, including the stylistic movements of the Baroque, Rococo, Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, Expressionism and Cubism.

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 1105 Fundamentals of Chemistry (3)
Fundamental concepts in chemistry will be discussed in the context of the world around us. Concepts will include the scientific method, atoms, molecules, compounds, mixtures and chemical reactions. These topics will, however, be introduced in the context of topics of current interest such as water quality, air pollution and global warming. This course will include a laboratory component that will be incorporated into the regular class period.

CORE

CORE 1101 Cornerstone (3)
This orientation course uses discussion of directed readings, journal writing, and group activities to develop strategies for effective reading, writing, critical thinking, and related skills necessary for successful college study. The course must be completed within the first two terms after enrollment and is required of all students who enter with less than 30 semester hours from a regionally accredited institution.

CORE 1140 Computer Applications (1)
Mathematical techniques and computer methods with spreadsheets are used in the development of quantitative reasoning skills. These techniques are examined in the contexts of business and economics and of sustainability through managing one’s personal finances. Pre-requisite: MTH 101 or higher

CORE 2001 Humanities I: Ancient through Medieval age. (3)
This course focuses on our cultural heritage with an emphasis on the impact of the Judeo-Christian tradition as it relates to all knowledge. The course balances the instructor’s selected academic theme with a common set of assignments and academic skill sets. The period from the emergence of human history to 1660 is covered in this course. Students confront primary and secondary source materials in order to gain a historical consciousness. Pre-requisite: ENG 102

CORE 2002 Humanities II: Renaissance to Present. (3)
This course focuses on our cultural heritage with an emphasis on the impact of the Judeo-Christian tradition as it relates to all knowledge. The course balances the instructor’s selected academic theme with a common set of assignments and academic skill sets. The period from 1660 to the present is covered in this course. Students confront primary and secondary source materials in order to gain a historical consciousness. Pre-requisite is ENG 102.

CORE 3001 The American Experience. (3)
This course focuses on the social structure, economics, politics, and culture of the United States. It examines many of the common assumptions about American society, especially meritocracy, freedom, and “justice for all.” In addition, the course considers issues of sustainability and how they have shaped America’s past and present and will continue to shape its future. Pre-requisite: CORE 2001 or CORE 2002

ENGLISH

ENGL 1101 Composition I (3)
Introduction to expository writing, emphasizing the essay form, the writing process, and rhetorical modes of thesis development. Students use conference days for peer editing and consultation with instructors. Prerequisite to all higher-numbered English courses.

ENGL 1102 Composition II (3 )
Introduction to critical thinking and writing about literature, emphasizing reading strategies and analytic writing.

ENGL 2204 British Literature I (3)
A survey of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon Period through the Eighteenth Century. Short critical essays required, with at least one entailing documentation.

ENGL 2205 British Literature II (3)
A survey of British literature from the Romantics through the Modern/Postmodern Period. Short critical essays required, with at least one entailing documentation.

ENGL 2206 American Literature I (3)
A survey of American Literature from the Colonial period through American Romanticism. Short critical essays required, with at least one entailing documentation.

ENGL 2207 American Literature II (3)
A survey of American literature from Realism and Naturalism through the Modern/Postmodern Period. Short critical essays required, with at least one entailing documentation.

ENGL 2208 World Literature (3)
A survey of classical works in translation, emphasizing the Greek, Roman, and Medieval periods. Short critical essays required, with at least one entailing documentation.

GENERAL SCIENCE

GSCI 1101 Earth Science I (3)
An introduction to the concepts, principles, and processes of Physical Geology with a brief consideration of Historical Geology.

GSC 102 Earth Science II (3)
A continuation of Earth Science I with elements. Prerequisite: GSC 101

HISTORY

HIST 1101 World Civilization I (3)
A survey course on the development of world civilization up to 1660.

HIST 1102 World Civilization II (3)
A survey course on the development of world civilization from 1660 to present.

HIST 1111 History of the United States to 1865 (3)
Emphasis on the Colonial, Revolutionary, early national, and Civil War periods.

HIST 1112 History of the United States, 1865 to the Present (3)
Emphasis on Reconstruction, liberal nationalism, New Deal, and postwar periods.

MATHEMATICS

MATH 0100 Basic Math (3)
An overview of basic skills in mathematics including ratios and proportion, percent use of fractions and decimals, systems of measurements and linear equations.

MATH 1101 College Algebra (3)
A study of sets, real numbers, operations, order, inequalities, polynomial factoring, functions, graphs, exponents, first- and second-degree equations, and systems of equations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 100 or satisfactory score on mathematics placement test.

MATH 1114 Statistics (3)
A study of problems related to statistical procedures as applied to economics, education, the social sciences, and the life sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 1101 or higher.

MODERN LANGUAGE/CULTURE
(LANG may refer to French, German, Korean, or Spanish)

LANG 1101 Beginning Language I (3)
A course for beginners with intensive practice in oral communications, pronunciation, essentials of grammar, and where possible, reading of simple prose.

LANG 1102 Beginning Language II (3)
A continuation of Spanish 101.

LAST 1104 Introduction to Latin American Culture (3)
A study of the art, literature, history, and anthropology of Latin America.

LAST 2000 Introduction to Latin American Studies (3)
An interdisciplinary approach to the people, culture, development, and identity of Latin America. Attention will be given to such topics as art, class, economics, gender, history, literature, music, politics, race, and religion.

MUSIC

MUSI 1100 Music Fundamentals
Provides an introduction to elementary music theory, including scales, key signatures, staff notation, clefs, rhythm, meter intervals, and general music terminology

MUSI 1112 Music Survey (3)
A broad survey of music from the Western classical tradition aimed at developing aesthetic awareness and critical analysis of music from diverse styles and genres.

PHYSICS

PHYS 1105 The Solar System (3)
A descriptive overview of the solar system and its place in the Milky Way Galaxy and the universe. Topics covered include the celestial coordinate system, time keeping, cycles of the sun and moon, astronomical influences on Earth’s climate, gravity, light and telescopes, ancient astronomy, origin of the solar system, comparative planetology of the planets, and meteors and asteroids.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLS 1101 United States Government Global Perspective (3)
An introduction to political science through an analysis of the political system of the United States.
Topics considered include: basic concepts of political science, federalism, civil liberties and civil rights, basic governmental institutions, elections and public opinion, political parties and groups, and domestic and foreign public policy.

POLS 1102 Introduction to Political Science (3)
An introductory course that focuses on the nature of the discipline of political science and deals with the way political scientists study politics through an overview of the major topics of the discipline.

POLS 2210 Comparative Politics in Global Perspective (3)
An introduction to comparative analysis of political systems. Topics considered include basic concepts of comparative theory, modern political history in developed and developing areas, the interactions of political and economic factors in developed and developing areas, politics and state institutions in selected countries, and comparative aspects of domestic and foreign public policy.

POLS 2220 International Politics: States in the Global System (3)
An introduction to the interaction of nation-states in the global system. Topics considered include war and power, economic and social interdependence, and problems specifically associated with developing nations.

PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE

PSYC 1101 Introduction to Psychology (3)
A survey of major topics in psychology including basic neuroanatomy, motivation, learning perception, personality and abnormal behavior. This course is a prerequisite for all other psychology courses.

PSYC 3302 Human Growth and Development (3)
A study of normal life beginning with conception. Important developmental phenomena are considered in the light of major theories of development.

RELIGION

RLGN 1101 Introduction to Christianity (3)
An introduction to the Christian tradition of faith through a study of its central symbols, sacred texts, and practices.

RLGN 1102 Jewish Origins in Context (3)
A study of the Hebrew bible, commonly called by Christians the Old Testament, in the context of the ancient near eastern world. The course asks students to reflect on the impact of the Hebrew bible on Western civilization and its implications for the contemporary world.

RLGN 1103 New Testament Writings in Context (3)
A study of the New Testament writings in the context of Greco-Roman civilization. The course asks students to reflect on the impact of Christian scriptures on Western civilization and consider their implications for the contemporary world.

RLGN 1104 Dialogue with World Faith Traditions. (3)
The course places the insights of the Christian faith in dialogue with those of major living world religions, such as Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Confucianism, and Daoism.

RLGN 1105 Christian Ethics and Contemporary Social Issues. (3)
A study of contemporary ethical issues in the light of the moral traditions central to the Christian faith. The course examines such issues as marriage and family, war and peace, racism, abortion, and the environment. Servant leadership component.

RLGN 1106 American Christianity (3)
This course will be an investigation of the origins of denominationalism in America. The class will read a history of American Christianity, but will look further afield by analyzing some of the particularly American expressions such as Mormonism, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and Christian Science.

RLGN 1107 Religious Faith in a Scientific Age (3)
Contemporary debates over intelligent design, climate change, evolution, and stem cell research demonstrate the lively and sometimes contentious interactions between science and religious faith. Students will develop personal positions about the relationships of science and religion and develop ethical perspectives on such controversial biomedical practices as human reproduction, genetic engineering, and end-of-life care.

RLGN 1108 Earth Theology (3)
This course explores the inherent value of the Earth, examines, the human impact on the environment, and explores ways to address the present global environmental crisis with Biblical and theological resources. Students will become acquainted with some prominent thinkers and theologians who are taking action regarding environmental concerns while discovering sustainable connections between theological reflection and ethical living.

SOCIOLOGY

SOCI 1000 Introduction to Sociology (3)
A study of the fundamental concepts and principles of the discipline, with emphasis on socialization, social institutions, social interaction, social stratification and inequality, as well as mechanisms of social control. Familiarization with the distinction between macro- and micro-level sociological processes will be emphasized.

SOCI 2500 Kinship and Families (3)
An analysis of contemporary marriage and family experiences. SOCI 3500 Race/Ethnicity and Gender in Society. (3) As needed Prerequisite: SOCI 1000 Students will become aware of the impacts of race, ethnicity and gender in a global society. The norms, values, and patterns of communication associated with each category and how these affect personal life choices and social status will be examined. Specifically, students will become aware of how our basic social institutions, such as the economy, the family, education, religion, and the political system are biased institutions with differing ideals and expectations for women and men as well as different race and ethnic groups.

SPEECH
SPCH 1105 Speech Fundamentals (3) A course emphasizing development of organizational and delivery skills through individual speaking exercises in a variety of formats including informative, demonstrative and persuasive.

THEATRE ARTS

THEA 1101 Drama Survey I (3)
A survey of the discovery of theatre, beginning in ancient Greece and continuing through the rise of Realism. Students will study theatre as a developed art form through the reading, viewing and discussion of plays representing diverse eras of history.

THEA 1102 Drama Survey II (3)
A survey of the discovery of theatre from the rise of Realism through contemporary drama. Students will study theatre as a developed art form through the reading, viewing & discussion of plays representing diverse eras of history.

Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration Courses


ACCT 2211 Principles of Financial Accounting (3) Fall
This is a foundation-level accounting course that introduces the terminology, principles, and practices of financial accounting for corporations. The course’s major focus is the accounting cycle and preparation of financial statements.

ECON 2200 Principles of Economics (3) Fall
An introduction to the science of economics and its analytical tools. This course is devoted to providing the student with a thorough understanding of the basic principles of a) microeconomics: the study of the economic behavior of individual households and firms and the determination of factor prices, and b) macroeconomics: the study of the determination of the aggregate levels of income, output, employment, and prices and the examination of fiscal and monetary policy.

FNCE 3354 Business Performance Analysis (3) Spring
A comprehensive survey of the basic tools and models used in contemporary financial statement analysis. Prerequisite ACCT 2211

MGMT 2200 Foundations in Business (3) Spring
The course provides an introduction to the functional areas of business as students work through a series of situations in a computer simulation. Working in teams, students problem-solve and make decisions in management, accounting, operations, and marketing that affect the viability of the BizCafe coffee shop, thereby gaining insights into the opportunities and challenges that confront business owners.

MGMT 3351 Legal and Ethical Environment of Business (3) Spring
This course addresses the legal and ethical implications of business decisions. Topics may include legal organization, employment, discrimination, contracts, workplace, safety, product liability and antitrust issues. Cost-benefit analysis will be used as a tool to evaluate business decisions in light of existing legal rules and social responsibility.

Prerequisites: MGMT 2200, ECON 2200, ACCT 2211
MGMT 3370 Management and Organizational Behavior (3) Fall and Spring
The course explores the art and science of management and examines behaviors at the individual, group, and enterprise levels that advance or hinder work in organizations. The focus will be on understanding how to effectively manage performance and change in today’s complex business environment.

Prerequisites: MGMT 2200, ECON 2200, ACCT 2211
MGMT 3385 Management Information Systems (3) Spring
This course is designed for future managers who need to understand and critically evaluate the role and potential contribution of information technology for their organizations, and understand and effectively apply various computerized support systems to make better decisions.

Prerequisites: MGMT 2200, ECON 2200, ACCT 2211
MGMT 3392 International Business (3) Spring
This course is a comprehensive study of the economic forces affecting global commerce and the socioeconomic complexity in which the international manager live and work. The course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of both the global macro-economic environment as well as grasp some of the essentials of managing the micro-economic variables in a global context.

Prerequisites: MGMT 2200, ECON 2200, ACCT 2211
MGMT 4401 Foundations of Entrepreneurship (3) Fall A study of the application of the science of management to the development and management of the small business enterprise. Opportunities, characteristics, and problems with the small business will be evaluated. Students will be required to develop a business plan for a small business and when possible students will be given an opportunity to work on special projects with small businesses in the community. The class requires active participation by students in and out of the classroom.
Prerequisites: MGMT 2200

MGMT 4410 Social Entrepreneurship (3) Spring
The course builds on the principles of entrepreneurship studied in MGMT 4401. It explores the ways to couple business acumen with vision and creativity to solve problems through the development of mission-based enterprises. Field work with a community agency and development of a Concept Proposal for a social enterprise are significant components of the course. Prerequisites: MGMT 4401

MGMT 4440 Senior Capstone (3) Spring
This is the capstone course for majors in business. It incorporates the use of a computer-based simulation in an effort to integrate all of the functional areas of business into one comprehensive course. Students are required to work in groups as managers of a simulated company and make the necessary marketing, finance, economic, accounting, and management decisions to run their company effectively. The student’s grades are a function of individual and group performance.
Prerequisites: Senior standing, completion of all course requirements in major, or consent of instructor

MGMT 4483 Special Topics (2 - 5) On Demand
A series of “special topic” courses providing students with exposure to issues and concepts not covered in their regular coursework.
Prerequisites: senior standing and consent of instructor

MRKT 3380 Principles of Marketing (3) Fall and Spring
This course is an introduction to the principles of marketing management and the role of marketing in a contemporary society, in business enterprises, and in a non-profit organization. Considers the planning, operation, and evaluation of marketing and promotional efforts necessary to the effective marketing of consumer and industrial offerings. During the course, the students will be tasked with the assignment of developing and presenting a marketing plan for a local business.
Prerequisites: MGMT 2200, ECON 2200, ACCT 2211

Bachelor of Arts in Human Development and Family Studies Courses


PSYCHOLOGY

*PSYC 1000 Introduction to Psychology. (3) Fall and Spring
A survey of major topics in psychological science, including research methods, basic neuroanatomy, learning, perception, personality and abnormal behavior. [online only]
Prerequisite to all other PSY or PSYC courses.

PSYC 3202 Human Growth and Development. (3) Spring
A study of human life beginning with conception. Important developmental phenomena are considered in the light of major theories of development.

PSYC 3304 Educational Psychology. (3) Fall
Application of psychological principles and research to the teaching/learning process. Major topics include behavioral and cognitive approaches to learning, classroom management, and test construction and interpretation. [online only]

PSYC 3321 Social Psychology. (3) Fall
A course dealing with behavior as affected by social influences. Major topics include social perception, social communication (verbal and nonverbal), altruism, attitudes, aggression, and prejudice. Also, applied areas such as forensic psychology are considered.
PSYC 3350 Abnormal Psychology. (3) Spring
A survey of the causes, characteristics, current theories, and treatment of psychological disorders.

PSYC 3351 Introduction to Counseling. (3) Fall
An introduction to counseling approaches, methods, and assessment techniques. Emphasis is placed on individual counseling.

PSYC 3358 Psychology of Aging. (3) Spring
Human aging is examined from physiological (e.g., sensory and cardiovascular changes), psychological (e.g., memory and intellectual changes), and sociological (e.g., adjusting to retirement) perspectives. Also, death and disorders associated with aging (such as Alzheimer's Disease) are explored. [online only]

SOCIOLOGY

SOCI 1000 Introduction to Sociology (5) Fall
A study of the fundamental concepts and principles of the discipline, with emphasis on socialization, social institutions, social interaction, social stratification and inequality, as well as mechanisms of social control. Familiarization with the distinction between macro- and micro-level sociological processes will be emphasized. [online only]

Prerequisite to all other SOC or SOCI courses.
SOCI 2500 Kinship and Families (5) Spring This course offers a multi-disciplinary perspective on contemporary marriages, families, and other intimate relationships. Students will become familiarized with competing models and theories on family relationships. In addition, the course explores cross-cultural variation in family systems as well as diversity and change within the American population. Topics to be covered include: mate selection, marital structure, marital happiness, divorce, parenting, and alternative family forms. [online only]

SOCI 3200 Social Responsibility and Civil Society (3) Fall
Students will examine past social justice movements as well as the meaning of civil society. In addition, students will examine the 21st century idea of social entrepreneurship. Combining these approaches, students will determine the meaning of a civil society and its implications for social responsibility and policy.

SOCI 3500 Race/Ethnicity and Gender in Society (3) Spring
Students will become aware of the impacts of race, ethnicity, and gender in global society. The norms, values, and patterns of communication associated with each category and how these affect personal life choices and social status will be examined. Specifically, students will become aware of how our basic social institutions, such as economy, the family, education, religion, and the political system are biased institutions with differing ideals and expectations for women and men as well as different race and ethnic groups. [online only]

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

HDFS 4411 Child Development Internship (3-6) On Demand
Students majoring in Human Development and Family Studies may be eligible to enroll in an internship dealing with children or children’s issues. This course requires 120 hours of supervised experience (observation, work, etc.) in a local agency or office, selected readings, public presentation, and a final portfolio containing reflective essays, weekly journal, and supporting material. The internship must first be discussed with the student’s primary advisor one semester prior to enrolling in the course. Information from this meeting will then be transferred to the Career Development Center for placement. The application process might be different depending on the student’s placement.
Prerequisites: Major in Human Development and Family Studies with junior or senior standing, minimum 3.0 GPA, and permission of the program coordinator.

HDFS 4412 Adult Development Internship (3-6) On Demand
Students majoring in Human Development and Family Studies may be eligible to enroll in an internship dealing with adults or adult issues. This course requires 120 hours of supervised experience (observation, work, etc.) in a local agency or office, selected readings, public presentation, and a final portfolio containing reflective essays, weekly journal, and supporting material. The internship must first be discussed with the student’s primary advisor one semester prior to enrolling in the course. Information from this meeting will then be transferred to the Career Development Center for placement. The application process might be different depending on the student’s placement.
Prerequisites: Major in Human Development and Family Studies with junior or senior standing, minimum 3.0 GPA, and permission of the program coordinator.

HEALTH AND NUTRITION

NURS 3305 Nutrition and Health (2) Fall
An introduction to nutrition concepts and current dietary trends, focusing on health promotion. Nutrients are explored with regard to sources, dietary requirements, and heal implications. [online only]

HPED 3333 Yoga for Wellness (2) Fall
A study of the effects that yoga has on all aspects of the human body, including physical, mental, and spiritual. Topics will include breathing techniques, asanas, fasting, meditation, and different disciplines of yoga.



Student Life

Evening College is committed to providing a positive environment that attends to a student's intellectual, emotional, spiritual and social development. LaGrange College sponsors a variety of cultural events and recreational activities for the enjoyment of students and their families. The College also provides programs designed to support every dimension of students’ well-being. We welcome and encourage student participation in all campus programs.

In addition to providing a positive climate for growth and development, LaGrange College is committed to fostering an honorable standard of conduct for all within our community.