Chemistry Courses

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CHEM)
(Textbook Information)

Chemistry is a laboratory science, and the department views the laboratory experience as an essential component of those courses with an associated laboratory. Consequently, students must achieve a passing grade in both the lecture and laboratory portions of the course to obtain a passing grade in the course.

CHEM 1005 Survey of Chemistry (3 hrs. lecture per week)
(3)
Selected topics in General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry are studied during this one semester course. Topics will include chemical equations, stoichiometry, chemical nomenclature, functional groups, and classification of biological molecules with a focus on enzymes. The course is appropriate for exercise science or allied health students where no further chemical study is anticipated.
Prerequisites: Math 1101 or placement into Math 2105 or higher

CHEM 1101 General Chemistry I.
(3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab per week)
(4) Fall
A study of the foundations of chemistry, including stoichiometry, atomic structure and periodicity, molecular structure and bonding models, and thermochemistry.
Prerequisite: MATH 1101 or placement in MATH 2105 or higher

CHEM 1102 General Chemistry II. (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab per week)
(4) Spring
A continuation of CHEM 1101; a study of the gas, liquid, and solid phases, chemical thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibria, acid/base equilibria, oxidation-reduction reactions, and electrochemistry.
Prerequisites: CHEM 1101

CHEM 2251 Analytical Chemistry. (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab per week)
(4) Fall (even years)
A study of the theory and practice of volumetric and gravimetric quantitative analysis, chemical equilibrium, and acid/base chemistry.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1102

CHEM 3201 Organic Chemistry I. (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab per week)

(4) Fall
A study of the fundamentals of organic chemistry with respect to the bonding, structure, nomenclature, and reactivity of various classes of organic compounds, including aromatic compounds.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1102

CHEM 2202 Organic Chemistry II. (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab per week)

(4) Spring
A continuation of CHEM 2201, including spectroscopy, synthesis, carbonyls, and biomolecules.
Prerequisite: CHEM 3201

CHEM 3301 Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Chemical Kinetics. (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab per week)
(4) Fall (even years)
A study of the basic principles of physical chemistry, including the properties of gases, kinetic theory of gases, thermodynamics, thermochemistry, changes of state, phase rules, electrochemistry, and chemical dynamics
Prerequisites: CHEM 2202 or permission of instructor,MATH 2221, PHYS 1102 or PHYS 1122

CHEM 3302 Physical Chemistry: Chemical Dynamics and Quantum Mechanics. (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab per week)
(4) Spring (odd years)
The study of basic principles of physical chemistry, focusing on gas kinetics, chemical dynamics, quantum mechanics, and atomic and molecular spectroscopy.
Prerequisites: MATH 2222, PHYS 1102 or PHYS 1122

CHEM 3311 Elements of Physical Chemistry. (3 hrs. lecture per week)
(3) Spring (even years)

An overview of thermodynamics, chemical dynamics, and quantum chemistry taught at the algebra level and including applications to biological systems.
Prerequisites: CHEM 3202 or permission of instructor, MATH 2105 or placement in MATH 2221, PHYS 1101 or PHYS2121.

CHEM 3331 Inorganic Chemistry. (3 hrs. lecture per week)
(3) Spring (odd years)

An in-depth examination of atomic and molecular structure with a focus on inorganic molecules and complexes. Point Group Symmetry concepts will be introduced and applied.
Prerequisite: CHEM3201

CHEM 3371 Junior Seminar. (1 hr. class per week)
(1) Spring
A course that acquaints the student with the chemical literature as well as presentation and discussion of scientific data and information. In addition, students explore career opportunities, prepare a portfolio, and develop career plans. Note: Course is graded on a pass/no credit basis.
Prerequisite: junior standing

CHEM4201 Advanced Organic Chemistry. (3 hrs. lecture per week)
(3) on demand

CHEM4201 is an extension of the study of organic chemistry as begun in the CHEM3201-3202 series, with the addition of special topics of interest for organic chemists not covered in that series.
Prerequisite: CHEM 3202

CHEM 4421 Biochemistry I. (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab per week)
(4) Fall
An introductory course in the principles of biochemistry, with emphasis on the structure and function of biomolecules, membrane structure and function, and an introduction to metabolism and bioenergetics.
Prerequisite: CHEM 2202 or permission of instructor

CHEM 4422 Biochemistry II . (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab per week)
(4) Spring
A continuation of CHEM 4421, with emphasis on cellular metabolism, fundamentals of molecular genetics, and current topics in biochemistry.
Prerequisite: CHEM 4421

CHEM 4451 Instrumental Analysis. (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab per week)
(4) Spring (even years)

A study of the basic instrumentation used for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of organic and inorganic compounds. This course examines the major instrument types used for this purpose, highlighting instrument design and operation, sampling and the interpretation of output.
Prerequisite: CHEM 3201 or consent of the instructor

CHEM 4471 Senior Seminar. (2 hrs. class per week)
(2) Spring
A capstone course that is thematic. Emphasis is on integration of the student's experience in chemistry and the presentation of chemical literature in seminar and written form.
Prerequisite: senior standing

CHEM 4800 Special Topics.
(1-4 hours) on demand
A special topic course that may be designed to provide the student with exposure to topics and concepts not covered in the regular course offerings.

CHEM 4900 Independent Study.
(1-4 hours) on demand
This course can vary and may be used to satisfy the research requirement for the B.S. major and provide research experience for B.A. majors.



Apply Now

Career Information:

Employment sectors with the greatest number of chemistry employees were: 

  1. Industry (including chemical and pharmaceutical companies)
  2. Academic institutions
  3. Government laboratories

Agriculture, manufacturing, real estate, educational services, retail trade and healthcare contributed another five million jobs to the U.S. economy through their dependence on chemistry products.